About The Thrivapy Blog


I created The Thrivapy Blog to share my thoughts and ideas about living a learning lifestyle.

For more, visit my website: www.thrivapy.com
Thank You,
Dr. Troy P. Roddy

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Yes, My Teacher Likes Me

I recently wrote a post suggesting that flipping the question, "Do you like your teacher?" to "Does your teacher like you?" can provide a useful insight into the important student/teacher relationship, especially with middle school students. In this post, I begin exploring possible answers and what to do with those answers.

"Yes"

One of the answers you might get is, "Yes." Upon hearing this you may be tempted to think that if the relationship is strong, then there is nothing to explore. That is not an unusual response. My observations have been that parents, teachers, and students are more likely to seek and act upon challenges than successes. However, there is much to learn from success and a middle school student announcing that her teacher likes her is in many ways a success.

Successful relationships with middle school students are sometimes a challenge to establish and maintain. While all relationships take effort, this time in life is like swimming in a "relationship swamp" with unknown (and if you are an adult, sometimes illogical) twists and turns that can pop up at any time. Exploring a successful relationship deeper to gain a better understanding of how to strengthen yours is useful.

One way to get a deeper understanding is to ask some follow up questions such as, "Explain how you know your teacher likes you?" or "What does your teacher do that sends the message that you are liked?" The answers to these questions not only provides insight into why the student may feel another teacher doesn't like him, but also gives you clear examples of behaviors that you might use to strengthen your relationship, too. In addition, thee examples might serve as tips on how to motivate your student to work harder, especially if you link success to effort and effort to relationships.

Getting a "Yes" is an often missed opportunity to get valuable information about the mindset of a student. If you get that answer to, "Does your teacher like you?", explore the answer further and make note of the insights you discover.